What did pioneers need to survive?

The pioneers would take with them as many supplies as possible. They took cornmeal, bacon, eggs, potatoes, rice, beans, yeast, dried fruit, crackers, dried meat, and a large barrel of water that was tied to the side of the wagon.

What dangers did the pioneers face?

Major threats to pioneer life and limb came from accidents, exhaustion, and disease. Crossing rivers were probably the most dangerous thing pioneers did. Swollen rivers could tip over and drown both people and oxen. Such accidents could cause the loss of life and most or all of valuable supplies.

What did the pioneers take with them?

Two hundred pounds of flour, thirty pounds of pilot bread, seventy-five pounds of bacon, ten pounds of rice, five pounds of coffee, two pounds of tea, twenty-five pounds of sugar, half a bushel of dried beans, one bushel of dried fruit, two pounds of saleratus, ten pounds of salt, half a bushel of corn meal; and it is …

Did pioneers sleep in covered wagons?

Some pioneers did sleep in their wagons. Some did camp on the ground—either in the open or sheltered under the wagon. But many used canvas tents. Despite the romantic depictions of the covered wagon in movies and on television, it would not have been very comfortable to travel in or sleep in the wagon.

What were some challenges the pioneers faced while on the trails?

Obstacles included accidental discharge of firearms, falling off mules or horses, drowning in river crossings, and disease. After entering the mountains, the trail also became much more difficult, with steep ascents and descents over rocky terrain. The pioneers risked injury from overturned and runaway wagons.

How did pioneers treat dysentery?

Castor oil was used to treat dysentery and other bowel disorders. Mountain fever: Usually not fatal, with symptoms such as intestinal discomfort, diarrhea, headache, skin rashes, respiratory distress and fever.

What did the pioneers eat for dessert?

As for desserts — they were simple, but many and varied. There were apple dump- lings, rice and bread puddings, soft molasses cookies, sugar jumbles, and mincemeat, pumpkin, dried apple, or custard pies. On special occasions we might have lemon pie. It was not necessary to skimp on eggs or milk.

What did they eat on wagon trains?

Those who operated freight wagon trains subsisted on coffee, bread, salt pork and beans or cornmeal. Delicacies included oysters, which were packed in tins in the early years and later shipped fresh, and alcoholic beverages such as French Champagne and claret.

Why didn’t most pioneers ride in their wagons?

People didn’t ride in the wagons often, because they didn’t want to wear out their animals. Instead they walked alongside them, getting just as dusty as the animals. The long journey was hard on both people and animals. It was even hard on the wagons, which usually had to be repaired several times during the trip.

What did the pioneers do for fun?

They had races and played games such as Sheep Over the River, Hide and Seek, Pull the Rope, and Steal-Stick Duck-Stones. They also sang and danced. They made dolls from corn cobs and rags and used a bladder balloon for ball games.

How did pioneers make bacon?

One of the essentials for the traveling pioneers was bacon. Around 400 pounds of bacon was needed for a family of four. Molasses, brown sugar, and salt were added to cured pork meat to keep it longer. Bacon was packed in a barrel with bran so extreme heat won’t melt the fats.

What was a typical breakfast in 1800?

Before cereal, in the mid 1800s, the American breakfast was not all that different from other meals. Middle- and upper-class Americans ate eggs, pastries, and pancakes, but also oysters, boiled chickens, and beef steaks.

What kind of toys did Pioneers have?

Pioneer Games

Pioneer children had simple toys and games made out of any available materials such as pebbles, rope, pieces of wood and scraps of material. Dolls were made out of scraps of material and wool. Some toys were made of wood. Many of the games they played are still being played today.

What did pioneers do in their free time?

They played games such as hide-and-seek and tug-of-war. Foot races, hopscotch, marbles, and spinning tops were also popular. Playing hopscotch outside Job Carr Cabin Museum. When the weather was poor and children had to stay indoors, they could sing, read, or memorize poetry.

What was life like for a pioneer child?

Pioneer children helped their parents from the time they were very young. Girls learned to cook, grow gardens, and sew. Boys learned to hunt, raise crops, and build things. Both boys and girls might milk a cow, gather firewood or buffalo chips, or gather eggs.

What did pioneer kids eat?

Meals varied seasonally with a reliance on dried meats, fish, fruits, and vegetables when they were out of season. Find out more about what pioneer kids did for fun after school and on weekends in the next post.

Did pioneer children play marbles?

The boards and game pieces were often made of a homemade board and pieces of wood. Marbles were a rare and prized possession of the pioneer children. The most valuable was the “cat’s eye” that had a center that looked like an eye. … Jacks was another game that both boys and girls could play.

How does life today different from the life of a pioneer child?

Life for pioneer children was much different than life today. Children were responsible for many chores throughout the day such as cleaning, chopping wood, feeding farm animals, or making butter. Much of their day was spent helping family.

How did pioneers cook?

The first pioneers in most places ate by campfires. By necessity, foods were cooked by very simple methods. Dutch ovens, frying pans, boiling pots, and roasting spits were typically employed. … Improvements in housing and transportation enabled a greater variety of food to be prepared in more traditional ways.

How did pioneers make clothes?

The pioneers pulled flax plants from the ground, dried them and removed the seeds. They separated the flax fibers from the hard stalk and spun the fibers on a flax wheel to create thread for linen cloth. … After women created thread, they weaved it into whole fabric, typically with a loom.

What did the pioneers eat for lunch?

About midday, the travelers would stop for their “nooning” rest and meal. Lunch choices could include breakfast leftovers, more beans but now cold and with bacon, bread and crackers, rice and dried beef. A day’s travel ended in the early evening.

How did the pioneers preserve meat?

Brine was saltwater that was traditionally “strong enough to float an egg.” Preserved in this way, homesteaders could keep meats for weeks and months at a time. However, like the other staple of pioneer diet, salt pork, “salted down” meat had to be laboriously rinsed, scrubbed, and soaked before consumption.